Flora Yukhnovich
       
     
   
  
   
  
    
  
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  Parkinson's work demonstrates a physically intimate exploration of materiality, transformation and scale over time. Concerned with the interaction and tension between man made structures and those of nature, she uses methods of intervention to create unpredictable results.   Kiting  takes its name from the way in which small invertebrates move through the air at the mercy of the wind. Likewise, Parkinson instigates the movement of raw materials and the work becomes the moment when all action is suspended in a state of flux, which she refers to as 'static motion'.  Kiting  presents a selection of her two and three dimensional works using rudimentary elements such as sand, steel, wax and pigment.  Scale is used to temper experience. Wall pigment pieces loom large like paint in a swimming pool; at once immersive and restless. Wax works betray the grand size of their landscape inspiration, akin to small segments of moon rock. In a play of opposites, Parkinson makes grand gestures on small canvases and small markings across an entire room. Her intention being for the viewer to overshadow the work, else the work to encapsulate the viewer.  An art practice centring around basic elements is a collaborative process. Parkinson heightens this through a mixture of control and letting substances do their own thing in their own time.  The result is a metaphysical exploration deeply rooted in a choice of materials which enable the artist to suspend states of fluidity and construction.
       
     
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